UPDATE - May 15, 2017 

Where you help

UPDATE - April 3, 2017 


CRISIS OVERVIEW

The outlook for the coming months for people in East Africa looks difficult. The drought is widespread, and is deteriorating faster than was even expected.

Conditions are worrying across:

* southern and south-eastern Ethiopia

* northern and coastal Kenya

* almost all of Somalia

* south-eastern South Sudan

* north-eastern Uganda.

  DONATE NOW  


RAINFALL

As little as 1/4 of the expected rainfall fell during the October– December 2016 season.

The so called “long rains” in March–May 2016 had already been erratic and below average.

Water in these areas is becoming increasingly scarce. Rivers and water points are drying, and reaching alarmingly low levels.

Multiple consecutive years of poor rains means there has been little to no recovery among affected households - particularly those dependent on livestock for their food and income.

 

LOSS OF LIVESTOCK

Across the region, livestock are starving.

Immune systems are weakened, increasing the risk and incidences of opportunistic and endemic livestock disease outbreaks. Tens of thousands of animals have already died. In many areas, livestock reproduction has halted.

Migration in search of water is increasing both within and across national borders.

Experts note this year’s pastoral migration is random and opportunistic – herders are moving to pocket areas they believe have grazing available.

Some pastoralists are migrating to protected conservation areas:

* negative consequences for environmental gains

* increasing risk of disease transmission between wild animals and livestock.

 

Tensions and conflict are increasing due to:

* competition over limited natural resources

* overgrazing

* damage to the land

* livestock theft

* disease outbreaks

EXAMPLE: in Kenya several ‘farm invasions’ have been reported, especially in Laikipia.

 

IMPACT ON FAMILY INCOME

Livestock are rapidly losing value. Sheep and goats now sell for about one-third the normal price, cattle and camels fetch only half their normal market value.

EXAMPLE: In Somalia's Buale market, in January 2016 a goat traded for the equivalent of about 114 kg. At today's prices, the same goat trades for only 30 kg.

Sale of live animals make up the bulk of pastoralists’ earnings, and therefore incomes are declining. This leaves households with extremely limited alternatives.

At the same time, local prices for staple foods have skyrocketed, and are increasing as local availability diminishes.

EXAMPLE: In central and southern Somalia, grain prices doubled in January, compared with last year. In Uganda, maize prices are reaching near-record levels.

 

Milk is the main source of protein for pastoralists.

When it is not available - either from their own cows, or in the markets - households typically increase their cereal intake. However, with very high staple food prices, households are increasingly forced to sell their productive assets, or borrow food and money to survive.

EXAMPLE: The price of milk has increased by 40 percent in Somalia's Gedo region.

 

FOOD INSECURITY

More and more families are reporting they are eating:

* less food

* less often

* less nutritionally diverse.

Malnutrition rates among children are high, and are increasing.

Severe food insecurity has dramatically increased in recent months:

* doubling in Kenya and Somalia

* quadrupling in Uganda

* in Ethiopia the number of food insecure districts has increased by 25%

 

In mid-February 2017:

* the drought was declared a national emergency in Kenya

* famine was declared in South Sudan

* famine alerted as real risk in Somalia if the next rains are below average.

 

 SAVE LIVES NOW 

 

LOOKING AHEAD

The situation will continue to deteriorate not only until the next rains, but until pastures regenerate – even if sufficient rainfall will be received.

Forecasts for the next rainy season from the Greater Horn of Africa Climate Outlook Forum indicate that the next rains are likely to be below-normal in most of drought-hit areas. The expected onset of the rains is early to mid-April, and the duration just four to six weeks.

If this happens, it will mean a third poor season of rainfall for most affected communities.

The U.N. humanitarian chief Stephen O’Brien stated after a visit that the famine in South Sudan is man-made due to the three-year civil war.

Ethiopia is experiencing below average rains in the southern and eastern parts of the country caused by the negative Indian Ocean dipole and La Niña leading to drought.

NB: This is a repeat of last year when drought caused by the El Niño climate phenomenon left 10.2 million people hungry and several hundred thousand of animals killed.

Somalia is also facing the brunt of the climate change coupled with the Islamist group Al Shabaab insurgency making humanitarian access in many parts difficult or impossible. According to the U.N., 6.2 million people in Somalia need humanitarian assistance and protection, including 2.9 million who are at risk of famine and require immediate help.

Another poor rainy season would be particularly disastrous in Somalia, where averting famine hinges on good performance of the coming season.

NB: During the previous famine in Somalia in 2011, humanitarian response was slow and nearly 260,000 people died before the famine was officially declared in July.

For Kenya, drought is affecting 23 of its 47 counties in the country.

 


 UPDATE - March 30, 2017 - Your Action

YOUR ACTION THROUGH ALWS 

The ALWS family has rallied quickly and generously to help people in East Africa hurt by the hunger crisis caused by conflict and drought. Thank You!

Below you will see a summary of the lifesaving work in East Africa you are supporting through ALWS.  Your help is delivered by our partner Lutheran World Federation (LWF), and is linked to the responses of churches worldwide through ACT Alliance.

Please note our new action in Unity State in South Sudan. This is the state where the UN declared three counties to be in famine.


IMPORTANT:
ALWS acknowledges the Australian Government supplying an extra $20 million worth of Australian aid to Somalia and South Sudan 

 

SOUTH SUDAN

Unity State   New

  • School feeding for 1,600 children
  • Dry rations for 142 days (school year)
  • $160 cash grants to 2,500 families to buy food locally – fast action
  • Support 140 teachers in 7 schools to keep teaching - $533 each

Jonglei State   Ongoing

  • Fishing kits and training
  • Poultry-rearing
  • Vegetable seed kits
  • Hygiene kits for girls
  • School stationery kits

 

SOMALIA   New

Kismayo District, Lower Jubba

  • Daily hot meal for 6 months + clean water + hygiene-training + handwashing and toilet facilities for 7,080 children in 5 schools
  • Business start-up grants for 1,000 people with specific needs

 

KENYA  

Garissa & Turkana   New

  • Truck in water for 85,903 people
  • 10m3 water tanks – 10 needed
  • Treat and vaccinate livestock
  • Pay in food school fees for children from poorest families

 Dadaab Refugee Camp   Ongoing – increased need

  • Mosquito nets and mattresses for elderly
  • Skills training to earn income
  • Psychosocial support

Kakuma Refugee Camp   Ongoing – increased need

  • Hot meals for new arrivals
  • Support children with special needs
  • Support children at pre-school

 

DJIBOUTI   New 2016

Ali Addeh refugee camp

  • Build school for refugee children from Somalia and Ethiopia

Camp Obock refugee camp

  • Support refugee children from Yemen to attend school

 

ETHIOPIA  New 2016

  • 56,866 people meet daily food needs
  • 9,070 farm families reduce drought risk
  • Cash-for-Work to rehabilitate 46 ponds and 15 kilometres of access roads
  • 391 tonnes of crop seed (teff, sorghum, faba-beans, maize, lentils) to help 3,128 drought-affected households

 

DARFUR Expanded

  • Support people displaced inside Sudan
  • Therapeutic food distribution
  • Primary health-care
  • Hand-pumps and boreholes
  • School latrines
  • Hand-washing facilities
  • Sanitary kits for girls

 

BURUNDI   Ongoing – monitor closely

Cankuzo & Ruyigi Provinces

  • Livestock and seeds
  • Agricultural training
  • Brick-making for houses

 

SAVE LIVES NOW 

Powerpoint slide for Schools and Churches 

MAP of area in Crisis 

 

UPDATE 20 March 2017 - FAMINE CRISIS

 

OUR ALWS 3 STEP CRISIS ACTION 

 The most effective way to protect people from the disaster of famine is to support people to be more resilient, and self-sufficient:

 1. Fishing hooks and line are critical, as in many places fish is the only food available.

 2. We will continue to supply vegetable seeds and tools.

 3. Income-generating activities like raising chickens and ducks, or setting up small shops, mean families can earn income to buy food.

PLUS, we fully support our LWF team in South Sudan to switch from long-term development work to whatever emergency action is needed to save lives.

 

HOW FAMINE IS DECLARED

The UN declares famine when 3 things happen at the same time:

  1.   20% of people face extreme food shortages
  2.  30% of people face acute malnutrition

  3.  2 people per 10,000 are dying every day

This is the first declared famine since Somalia in 2011, when thousands of children died. Already front-line aid-workers are saying this could be worse.

 

WHY THIS DISASTER HAS HAPPENED

 This famine has been caused by a combination of two factors:

  •   Drought – some places have not had rain for two years
  •  Conflict – 3 years of unrest have forced 1.5 million people from their homes: they host lost all their cattle, and even their farming tools

  Jonglei State, where our LWF team works, is already at EMERGENCY level. This is one step away from FAMINE level, and could be reached at any time. 

 That’s why it is so important we do more now.

YOUR PRAYER IS NEEDED TOO

South Sudan is regarded as the world’s most dangerous place for aid workers.

Please pray for safety for our LWF team, and all aid workers. Pray for families who have lost loved ones, or are living in fear. Pray for rain. Pray the leaders of the groups in conflict to find a way to come together.


DONATE NOW



UPDATE - 18 November 2016

 

THANK YOU!

The kindness and generosity of the ALWS family allowed us to provide $177,000 of aid to help farm families hurt by drought in Ethiopia. Thank you!

The good news is solid kiremt (summer) rains are providing a harvest that looks set to meet families’ food needs. Lentils have dropped 29% in price, giving families an affordable source of food. People can now have 3 meals a day instead of only two.

Extra income from Cash for Work projects is being used for family health-care, and to buy fodder for animals.

PEOPLE HELPED

Your help is implemented by Lutheran World Federation (LWF) Ethiopia.

 

District

Lasta District

Rayitu District

PEOPLE HELPED

Male

Female

TOTAL

Male

Female

TOTAL

Cash

For Work

1,876

944

2,820

733

131

864

3,684

Direct Cash Support

543

929

1,472

74

173

247

1,719

Seed Distribution

3,404

656

4,060

1,458

419

1,877

5,937

Total

5,823

2,529

8,352

2,265

723

2,988

11,340 people


HARVEST HOPE!

LASTA 

Lasta District has received moderately good kiremt (summer) rain from June until the beginning of September 2016.
This has improved food availability for farm families. Farmers could harvest green plants i.e. early maturing vegetables such as Kale to be used for food. Almost all crops sowed in the district have matured, and crops such as barley and lentils have already been harvested in the lowland kebeles of the district namely, Gelesot, Erfa and Shumsha.
In general, if the crops on the field are harvested without any problem (eg pest infestation), it is expected the community will have enough food to overcome the impact of drought.
The majority of kiremt harvest is expected to be collected from mid-October. Until then the farmers continue to largely rely on the Cash For Work program.

RAYITU

Rayitu district was dry and hot from July through to September. The pastoralist communities were traveling long distances in search of water and animal feed.

However, the situation is not as serious as same time last year because of the government–funded water trucking that was on-going this year in the district. There was, however, shortage of water in the areas where the community ponds are not providing enough both for livestock and human consumptions.

WHERE HELP WAS DELIVERED
Life-saving aid was delivered by LWF Ethiopia in eight kebeles of Lasta-Lalibela districts:
* Erfa
* Gelesot
* Mawure
* Terazfere
* Tefelemay
* Nakutole’ab
* Midagie
* Shumshaha

In Rayitu district, aid was delivered to six kebeles:

* Arda Nega
* Arda Kalo
* Halo Choma
* Jara Torbi
* Tedeche Bala
* Kare Tule 


HOW HELP WAS TARGETED 

Cash For Work activities achieved:

Physical Activity

Unit

Quantity Planned

(A)

Quantity/Volume Accomplished

First Interim Report

Second Interim Report

Cumulative up to reporting period (B)

Achieved

Stone bund

km

48.04

34.84

58.46

93.3

194%

Soil bund

km

32.12

42.23

81.67

123.9

386%

Stone check dam

M3

5,032

374.6

7,523.2

7,897.8

157%

Micro-basin

#

 

-

82

1,678

1,760

-

Bush clearing

ha

122.50

136

178

314

256%

Access road maintenance

km

6.35

2.71

7.19

9.90

156%

Maintenance of community ponds

#

8

-

6

6

75%


Direct cash support was given to the most vulnerable people:

-Elderly people
-Disabled people
-Pregnant and lactating women

 Seed distribution was directed to:

-Households with no seed reserve from their last harvest
-Households who have farm lands
-Female-headed households
-Beneficiaries who did not receive seeds from other response actors
-Seeds provided: Wheat, Teff, Maize, Lentils, Chickpea

 

YOUR PARTNERS THROUGH ALWS
Our efforts were linked in partnership with LWF Ethiopia through ACT Alliance, with support from:

  • Church of Sweden
  • Fin Church Aid
  • Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
  • Icelandic Church Aid
  • Evangelical Lutheran Church in Wurrtemberg

 

THANK YOU!

 

SAVE LIVES NOW 

 



The El Nino drought, changing climate and incountry conflict is causing tragedy across East Africa. Crops are destroyed, water sources dried up, livestock dying.

Children are now in desperate danger from hunger.

Through ALWS you help the families hurting most.

High priority right now is 4,771 families in Gaza Province in Mozambique. Children may have only one meal a day, leading to Severe Acute Malnutrition. They are then too weak to resist disease, and even diarrhoea.

Your gift of $98 can help a hungry family in Mozambique with maize and beans to eat now and drought-resistant seeds to plant.

Your lifesaving action includes:

  • Maize & beans Food Kit
  • Drought-resistant seeds
  • New farming methods
  • Use of compost / manure
  • Improved food storage
  • Training in nutrition
  • Disaster risk reduction.

Or your gift of $8 can provide a Kit of veggie seeds (okra, cow-peas and tomatoes) plus tools (hoe and sickle).

Please bring love to life for hungry families now. 

 

SAVE LIVES NOW 

All donations over $2 are tax deductible

Or call 1300 763 407 to give over the phone.


Information sheet and Map of areas in crisis

Powerpoint slide for churches and schools

Important: The information on this page explains how your donation can help people in East Africa in danger from hunger, and poverty, conflict and changing climate that cause it. Should ALWS receive income beyond what is needed here, those funds will be used to support and administer similar work in other areas. Information in this communication is based on data correct at time of writing, and may change. Funds and other resources designated for the purpose of aid and development will be used only for those purposes and will not be used to promote a particular religious adherence or to support a political party, or to promote a candidate or organisation affiliated to a particular party, or to support welfare activities as defined by DFAT. For more information, please call: 1300 763 407.